CJ Section

Airborne Radar for Navigation?

Strange that airborne radar is so seldom used nowadays for its original purpose. Bob Buck, author of the perennially-popular book “Weather Flying” and one of the greatest aviators of all time, once told me how in olden days he used airborne radar to navigate from Rome down across the Adriatic Sea to Athens. Due to Read More

Demons – Flight Risk

Air conditioning, humidity control, autopilots and auto-brakes. Airborne internet, coffee makers, drink chillers and butt warmers – they make our airplane feel just like home. These niceties permit our attention to be focused on the safe, efficient and enjoyable operation of the vehicle. But, they also make it easy to overlook the significance of operating Read More

Gremlins of Night Flight

Gremlins of Night Flight

Night flight has a tendency to bring out all the gremlins that most pilots are certain live in the wiring and other mysteriously-inaccessible spaces of their aircraft. In addition, the gremlins themselves, quite strangely, seem to become more active when the pilots are rushed. And, on this night, we were really in a hurry. It Read More

First Plane, a Jet

First Plane, a Jet

First Plane, a Jet How did it come to be that Tom Garritano’s first foray into aircraft ownership was a Cessna Citation Mustang jet? As he puts it, “The Cirrus I was renting was no longer available, so I said, ‘Looks like we’re going to have to buy an airplane.’ When Tom Craft called me Read More

Surely, That’s Wind Shear!

Fly long enough, and you’ll encounter the phenomenon of wind shear. Sometimes known as air pockets, sinkers, bumps, CAT (clear air turbulence) or simply updrafts and downdrafts, the common ingredient is a change in wind speed or direction over a relatively short horizontal or vertical distance. While aircraft tend to fly at a constant speed Read More