Transition to SETPs

Transition to SETPs

Photo Courtesy of Clint Goff Congratulations! You’re about to transition into a single-engine turboprop (SETP)! You’ll need to use most of the skills you’ve developed as a pilot of a piston-engine airplane. But there are significant differences in the way you’ll fly a turboprop – and only some of them are related to the engine Read More

Scenarios in Pilot Fatigue

Scenarios in Pilot Fatigue

PHOTO COURTESY OF TONY LAVAN From the NTSB: During the approximately five-hour, 25-minute night instrument flight, the pilot of a Pressurized Beech Baron elected not to stop at his planned fuel stop. Upon reaching the destination airport, weather conditions were 300 overcast and two miles visibility in drizzle, which were worse than the forecast. The Read More

IFR Oddities

When I earned my Instrument rating, it was common to include the phrase “No SIDs/No STARs” in the Remarks when filing an IFR flight plan. Partly we were being cheap. In those days you had to buy stacks of paper charts and books even for a single IFR flight, and the SIDs (Standard Instrument Departures) Read More

Barely VMC

Q: What’s the deadliest category of general aviation accidents? A: Attempted visual flight into Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). According to AOPA’s Air Safety Institute, when a “VFR into IMC” crash occurs, it is almost always fatal. Q: Who’s at risk of a Visual Flight Rules (VFR) flight into IMC? A: Experienced, often high-time pilots, in Read More

The Compliance Spectrum

The Compliance Spectrum

It’s a phrase found frequently in NTSB reports: “The pilot’s failure to….” An (admittedly old) NTSB survey of accidents from 1978 through 1990 revealed that procedural noncompliance was a factor in 78 percent of all crashes. It’s one thing to say the pilot failed to comply with a procedure. It’s another thing entirely to understand Read More